Maryke de Wet

before_image
BEFORE
after_image
AFTER
Name: Maryke
Surname: de Wet
Location: Johannesburg, Gauteng
Entry Date: Jul 23, 2021
Category: DIY
Project: Living Areas

About the Project:

I’ve always loved the old-school charm of Melville homes; timber floors, pressed ceilings, cottage pane windows. The house we bought had it all, but the kitchen and backyard was a little too outdated. My husband prefers more modern, contemporary designs so we decided to do a combination, bringing in new modern elements to compliment the…

Read More

I’ve always loved the old-school charm of Melville homes; timber floors, pressed ceilings, cottage pane windows. The house we bought had it all, but the kitchen and backyard was a little too outdated.
My husband prefers more modern, contemporary designs so we decided to do a combination, bringing in new modern elements to compliment the old. After much convincing from my side, hubby finally gave in and the project started in January 2020.

First we had to build new foundations for the new living room area, build up the floor and added stairs to the garden with planter boxes and an adjacent water feature. Then came the steel frame that would hold the roof. The roof consisted of timber beams, plywood boards with zink sheets. My father-in-law found a bullet-proof window alongside the road which we used as a skylight in the new roof. Now we had an ok-looking stoep!

Next was installing the new cottage pane panels. Then we removed the kitchen’s timber floors (which were quite rotten). With the gaping hole that used to be the kitchen floor, we demolished the exterior wall of the kitchen and threw all the rubble in the hole. That was my husband’s favourite part.

We used large cement boards to create a new kitchen floor structure and tiled both the kitchen and living room with the same large format tile so that the two spaces flow seamlessly together. We added new stone countertops to the kitchen cupboards and used the previous timber countertops as the wall shelves. The finishing touches included mosaic splash-back tiles and a good lick of plaster and paint everywhere.

Some challenges of the project was the fact that the entire house was skew. There was not a right angle anywhere so chose one wall and just built everything straight according to that wall. Another challenge was of course the lockdown of 2020 which forced us to do a lot more of the work ourselves. This was our first real big renovation and we were clueless. Luckily my father-in-law in a serial renovator so he helped us every step of the way.

The end result is gorgeous. The large cottage panes bring a lot of natural light into the house which used to be very dark and it is the room we spend most of our time in. Now I’m trying to convince hubby to add a second storey to another part of the house. I’m not successful yet but watch this space!

Budget Breakdown:

Materials:
Cottage pane panels
18463
Skylight
0
Floor tiles
8000
Track lights
1750
Cement boards
3934
Glass
6000
Lintels
330
building sand, adhesives, screws, plumbing pipes, primer, paint, trims, electric cord, polyfilla
6625
countertops
15190
splashback tiles
1200
pot drawer carcass
600
bricks, roof sheets, timber beams, steel columns, concrete, plywood sheets, insulation foam
11000
73092

Contractors:

Fotwane - plaster labour
900
Oscar - tile labour
3100
Angelo - welding labour
1400
5400
Grand Total
R78492